Remember Boston

Where Were You? Students' Stories of the Boston Marathon Bombing • An ICMPA Media Literacy Project

Niti – Germantown, MD

When I was six years old, I had gone on vacation with my family to Japan. Our flight back to the United States was scheduled for September 11,2001. Back then I had no idea why I had to stay in Japan for two extra weeks. I had no idea what kind of terror and turmoil was happening in the United States, and how risky it was to hop on a plane and fly back home. Getting constant updates of the Boston Bombing through TV, radio, news, and social media really makes me wish that I were more mature when 911 occurred, so I could learn more about it and see it through different perspectives.

When I was six years old, I had gone on vacation with my family to Japan. Our flight back to the United States was scheduled for September 11,2001. Back then I had no idea why I had to stay in Japan for two extra weeks. I had no idea what kind of terror and turmoil was happening in the United States, and how risky it was to hop on a plane and fly back home. Getting constant updates of the Boston Bombing through TV, radio, news, and social media really makes me wish that I were more mature when 911 occurred, so I could learn more about it and see it through different perspectives.

I had some down time while waiting for an experiment to cool in an ice bath during my organic chemistry lab, so I decided to check my Facebook. As I scrolled down my news feed, all I saw were posts along the lines of “Pray for Boston.” That’s when I realized something terrible had happened. A million things rushed through my mind. Could it have been another terrorist attack? A nuclear missile, which had been a popular headline in the news during the past week? I checked my CNN application on my iPhone to find out about the bombing. After that, every 15 minutes or so I got more updates – there were more reported casualties and and more reported injuries. I knew the event was significant, but I didn’t understand the gravity of the event until later that night when I went on Facebook.

Pictures from the bombing flooded my newsfeed. The camera footage from the bombing was very graphic, it made me feel scared and deeply saddened. I distinctly remember one picture that my friend shared on Facebook that had a significant impact on me. It was of a man who ran into the danger to rescue someone whose legs were blown off, taking him to a wheelchair and pinching his artery closed with two fingers to lessen the spurting of his blood. Despite the catastrophic event, social media really put into light all of the heroes who sacrificed their safety for the well being of their fellow citizens.

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This entry was posted on 04/29/2013 by .
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